What's so good about Goat's Milk

What's so good about Goat's Milk

It may be a surprise to most that goat's milk has been used by humans for various produce far longer than cow's milk. In fact, studies have found that humans have been using goat and sheep milk in European countries over 7,500 years ago, between the central Balkans and Central Europe. While cow dairies soon followed, goat and sheep dairies are far older. Research provides evidence that the direct protein of cattle, sheep, and goat whey has been consumed by human populations for at least 5,000 years. This corroborates previous isotopic evidence for milk fats identified on pottery and cooking utensils in early farming communities.Here's are a breakdown of benefits, and reasons you should consider goat's milk: Digestion. Goat's milk is not completely free of lactose, the sugar found in cow's milk, but the lactose content in goat's milk is far lower. While it might not be a viable option for those with an intolerance to lactose, having less does make the milk a lot easier to digest for those who find other milks upset their stomach. Another reason goat's milk is easier to digest and easier on the gut is that the fat globules are smaller. Once in your stomach, the protein in goat's milk forms a softer curd, which is easier to digest. Skin Care: The fatty acids in goat's milk can care for your insides as well as your outside. These fatty acid's posses moisturising qualities the keep you skin soft, while the high levels of vitamin A help improve overall skin health and fights acne. Goat's milk has a similar pH level to humans, which mean it can be absorbed by the skin with less irritation while keeping bacteria at bay. There's also a lot of lactic acid which will help get rid of dead skin cells, making your complexion brighter It’s high in calcium and other minerals: Though we may long have reached for the cow’s milk to try and up our calcium intake, goat’s milk wins this one with around 33% of your recommended daily allowance of the mineral. Cow’s milk meanwhile, only has around 28%. Iron, magnesium and phosphorous are better absorbed in goat’s milk. It boasts healing properties: Goat’s milk has been found to have similar healing properties to olive oil and regular consumption is recommended as a home remedy for anaemia, magnesium deficiency, eczema and acne. It also boosts the regeneration of haemoglobin, which can be beneficial for those with osteoporosis. The high levels of zinc and selenium can also help prevent neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s. It contains fewer allergens: Cow’s milk contains 20 different allergens. It is the most common allergy among children and can persist into adulthood. These can cause allergic reactions including inflammation, hives, abdominal cramps, and colic in babies. Goat’s milk doesn’t contain the protein responsible for much of these reactions. Instead it contains A2 casein, which does not cause inflammation and makes goat’s milk the closest milk to human breast milk. It’s good for your cholesterol: Goat’s milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids. This is important because these are not stored as body fat and provide an energy boost. They are linked to the prevention of heart disease and the treatment of many intestinal conditions while lowering your cholesterol and increasing levels of good cholesterol.
Goats, the Good, the Bad, the Myths

Goats, the Good, the Bad, the Myths

If you love Goats as much as we do, then you already know how much fun and enjoyment they give back to their carer's. Below are some fun facts about Goats, some Good, some Bad and some Myths. You may already know some, but we'd like to share stuff we've discovered and interesting stuff we've learned from others. Baby Goats are called Kids. The "Death Nap", especially for new Goat owners this can be a scary and heart-stopping experience. Goats can have such a deep sleep state that they can look they have died, so much so, that it can be hard to wake them up. It's also something that you never get used to. Goats are picky eaters, we know, they won't eat Bracken Fern and they aren't interested in your Outdoor Furniture, your washing on the line, or your kid's toys. They may mouth them, which is their way of learning what something is, may also be testing if something is palatable. Goats (well most) love Blackberry, it's supposed to be medicinal for them. I have only heard of one (1) Goat that didn't like Blackberry so I'm guessing not all like Blackberry. Female Goats (DOES) are not mean, head butting or nibbling is more akin to play not aggression. Male Goats that are castrated (WETHERS) are nice too. Male Goats that are intact (BUCKS) can be aggressive and will bite and head butt. Goats Milk can be frozen with issues, unlike Cow or other animals milk, where freezing damages the enzymes and other goodness. Goats are herd animals, at least two (2) does or doelings (young females) so they have company, or they will be super sad and loud if left alone. You can though, have a single Goat with a cow, sheep or a horse. Bucks can and will be smelly and aggressive, which is a part of them bringing the does into heat for breeding. They will pee on themselves, drink their pee (yes they can reach their weiners). Just going near a Buck will get their stink on you, you don't even have to touch or handle them directly. Their pee contains pheromones that change the doe's hormones bring them into heat. Bucks can also cause issues with souring the does milk if in close proximity. If you milk your does, it would be better to use AI (Artificial Insemination), or have the does visit the bucks home to get pregnant. Goats Horns are made of the same stuff as our nails. You shouldn't use their horns to push, pull or try to control them, it can make them aggressive, and they will most likely move their heads quickly which can get you hurt. We have heard that grabbing their horns can hurt them and potentially kill them, I'm not sure about this I'm not a Goat, but I would play it safe for the Goats well being. Goats are escape artists and need good well-maintained fencing. Photo is for illustration only from Shutterstock (Not one of our Goats). Goats love to play and be the king of the castle. If you build play equipment make sure it's sturdy and not so high that they can hurt themselves when they jump off or push their paddock mates off. Photo for illustration only, not our goats.